2014 classes

Topics offered

 

Does the Old Testament leave a disturbing legacy? 

Description

These sessions will deal with a representative sample of Old Testament texts that careful Bible readers invariably stumble over. These are the texts that portray God as a warrior and appear to glorify war (Joshua 2), the texts that appear to condone the oppression of women (Judges 19), the texts that have been used to justify the abuse of children (Genesis 22), and the texts which describe apparently random acts of divine vengeance against those who stray (Numbers 25:6-9).

These texts, and others like them, seem to be at odds with the God who is ‘merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness’ (Exodus 34:6). We will look at the texts contextually and theologically with a view to discerning their vital role in the Bible and their message for today’s church.

Presenter
  • Peter Lockwood, Lecturer in Old Testament

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Baptised to live: living your faith in your daily life 

Description

It is a joy and a privilege in this country to be able to gather together regularly with fellow Christians in public worship where God forgives us, feeds us and blesses us as his people. From worship we head, with God’s blessing, into our daily lives; lives lived in a variety of way including marriages, families, work places, congregations, and community groups.

In his book, The Spirituality of the Cross, Gene Veith writes about our Christian calling, otherwise known as our Christian vocation. He talks about the spirituality of ordinary life. These evening classes will unpack what it means to be a Christian – right where God has placed us!

Presenter
  • Dr Andrew Pfeiffer, Head of the School of Pastoral Theology

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Frodo’s God: the theology of J.R.R. Tolkien 

Description

J.R.R. Tolkien was not only one of the greatest literary figures of the twentieth century, he was also one of the best lay theologians the church has produced. Tolkien, a committed Roman Catholic Christian, was instrumental in the conversion of his colleague C.S. Lewis, and later joined him to form the famous Inklings. Though Tolkien always said he wanted to avoid dabbling in theology, his fictional writings are full of spiritual and theological symbolism and nuance.

From the Silmarillion to The Lord of the Rings, from The Children of Hurin to The Hobbit, Tolkien’s writings are a source of rich theological, spiritual and ethical reflection within the Christian tradition. Join Dr Mark Worthing for a tour of the spiritual and theological richness of Tolkien. Discover fresh and richly symbolic discussions of the problem of evil; the nature of God as creator; grace; sin; mercy; pain and suffering; and forgiveness.

Presenter
  • Dr Mark Worthing, Senior Researcher at the Australian Lutheran Institute of Theology and Ethics

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